Academic Board

Members of the CCW Academic Board (previously known as the ‘Steering Committee’) are senior members of the University, with responsibility to guide and develop the research and research dissemination of the Centre. Each is actively involved in research in one of the Centre’s core disciples. In addition to Rob Johnson, Annette Idler, and Andrew Monaghan, the Board comprises:


Dominic Johnson received a D.Phil. from Oxford University in evolutionary biology, and a Ph.D. from Geneva University in political science. Drawing on both disciplines, he is interested in how new research on evolution, biology and human nature is challenging theories of international relations, conflict, and cooperation. He has published two books. Overconfidence and War: The Havoc and Glory of Positive Illusions (Harvard University Press, 2004) argues that common psychological biases to maintain overly positive images of our capabilities, our control over events, and the future, play a key role in the causes of war. Failing to Win: Perceptions of Victory and Defeat in International Politics (Harvard University Press, 2006), with Dominic Tierney, examines how and why popular misperceptions commonly create undeserved victories or defeats in international wars and crises. His current work focuses on the role of evolutionary dynamics, evolutionary psychology, and religion in human conflict and cooperation.

Professor Dominic Johnson

Alastair Buchan Chair of International Relations

Peter Wilson is Chichele Professor of the History of War at the University of Oxford and a Fellow of All Souls College. He is Chair of the CCW Academic Board. He worked previously at the universities of Hull, Newcastle and Sunderland, and has been a visiting fellow at the University of Münster, Germany. His research examines the history of warfare in Europe and the world between about 1500 and 1900 as well as German history from the middle ages to modernity. His books have been translated into Chinese, German, Italian, Japanese, Macedonian, Polish and Spanish, and include The Holy Roman Empire: A Thousand Years of Europe’s History (2016) and Europe’s Tragedy: A History of the Thirty Years War (2009) which won the Distinguished Book Award from the Society for Military History. Oxford University Press will publish his latest book, Lützen in their Great Battles: History, Culture, Legacy series in January 2018. Consultancy work includes the National War College Washington, US Naval War College, US Military Academy, and Shell. Media work includes BBC TV and Radio, Croatian State TV, Financial Times, and the Los Angeles Times. Whilst at Hull, he established and directed the Heritage Consortium and the North of England Consortium for Arts and Humanities. The first combines seven north-east England universities to provide a Centre for Doctoral Training in Heritage Research funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, while NECAH is a broader based doctoral training partnership of six institutions.

Peter Wilson is Chichele Professor of the History of War at the University of Oxford and a Fellow of All Souls College. He is Chair of the CCW Academic Board. He worked previously at the universities of Hull, Newcastle and Sunderland, and has been a visiting fellow at the University of Münster, Germany. His research examines the history of warfare in Europe and the world between about 1500 and 1900 as well as German history from the middle ages to modernity. His books have been translated into Chinese, German, Italian, Japanese, Macedonian, Polish and Spanish, and include The Holy Roman Empire: A Thousand Years of Europe’s History (2016) and Europe’s Tragedy: A History of the Thirty Years War (2009) which won the Distinguished Book Award from the Society for Military History. Oxford University Press will publish his latest book, Lützen in their Great Battles: History, Culture, Legacy series in January 2018. Consultancy work includes the National War College Washington, US Naval War College, US Military Academy, and Shell. Media work includes BBC TV and Radio, Croatian State TV, Financial Times, and the Los Angeles Times. Whilst at Hull, he established and directed the Heritage Consortium and the North of England Consortium for Arts and Humanities. The first combines seven north-east England universities to provide a Centre for Doctoral Training in Heritage Research funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, while NECAH is a broader based doctoral training partnership of six institutions.

Professor Peter Wilson

Chichele Professor of the History of War

John Alderdice is a psychiatrist by profession, but as Leader of the Alliance Party of Northern Ireland, he played a significant role in the Talks on Northern Ireland including the negotiation of the 1998 Good Friday Agreement. He was the first Speaker of the new Northern Ireland Assembly and has held many international positions including as President of Liberal International, the global network of more than 100 liberal political parties. Since 1996 he has sat as a Liberal Democrat life member of the House of Lords, and is currently Director of the Centre for the Resolution of Intractable Conflict at Harris Manchester College, Chairman of the Centre for Democracy and Peace Building in Belfast, and Presidente d’Honneur of Liberal International. Lord Alderdice sits on both the Academic Board and Advisory Committee of the Centre, acting as a link between the two Committees.

John Alderdice is a psychiatrist by profession, but as Leader of the Alliance Party of Northern Ireland, he played a significant role in the Talks on Northern Ireland including the negotiation of the 1998 Good Friday Agreement. He was the first Speaker of the new Northern Ireland Assembly and has held many international positions including as President of Liberal International, the global network of more than 100 liberal political parties. Since 1996 he has sat as a Liberal Democrat life member of the House of Lords, and is currently Director of the Centre for the Resolution of Intractable Conflict at Harris Manchester College, Chairman of the Centre for Democracy and Peace Building in Belfast, and Presidente d’Honneur of Liberal International.

Lord Alderdice sits on both the Academic Board and Advisory Committee of the Centre, acting as a link between the two Committees.

Baron John Alderdice

Senior Research Fellow, Harris Manchester College & Director, Centre for the Resolution of Intractable Conflict


Dr Eamonn Molloy is the Tutorial Fellow in Management Studies at Pembroke College, and Associate Fellow of Saïd Business School, University of Oxford. He is internationally recognised for his research that develops innovative approaches to understanding complex organization design, with particular emphasis on the strategic dynamics of project, programme and portfolio based organizations, and the role of technology in professional and organizational change. Eamonn has held academic posts at the Universities of Warwick, Bath and Lancaster. He has worked on collaborative research projects with numerous Government bodies including the National Health Service, Department for Education and Skills, Department for International Development, Natural Environment Research Council and the Economic and Social Research Council. He has also worked closely with private sector organizations including Cadbury Schweppes, Unilever, United Utilities, BNFL and major mining, oil and gas companies in South Africa and Mozambique.

Dr Eamonn Molloy is the Tutorial Fellow in Management Studies at Pembroke College, and Associate Fellow of Saïd Business School, University of Oxford. He is internationally recognised for his research that develops innovative approaches to understanding complex organization design, with particular emphasis on the strategic dynamics of project, programme and portfolio based organizations, and the role of technology in professional and organizational change.

Eamonn has held academic posts at the Universities of Warwick, Bath and Lancaster. He has worked on collaborative research projects with numerous Government bodies including the National Health Service, Department for Education and Skills, Department for International Development, Natural Environment Research Council and the Economic and Social Research Council.

He has also worked closely with private sector organizations including Cadbury Schweppes, Unilever, United Utilities, BNFL and major mining, oil and gas companies in South Africa and Mozambique.

Dr Eamonn Molloy

Tutorial Fellow in Management Studies at Pembroke College & Faculty Member at the Saïd Business School

Dr Adrian Gregory is the Damon Wells Fellow in Modern History at Pembroke College and Associate Professor of Modern History in the History Faculty, University of Oxford. He directs CCW’s sister programme on the Globalising and Localising the Great War. Adrian's research interests lie in twentieth century British and European History with special reference to the World Wars. As part of his research on the First World War in British and Global History, he is in the final phases of a new short history of the war to be published by Oxford University Press and has recently contributed a chapter on 'Religion and Belief' to the new Cambridge Encyclopaedia of the First World War. He is also in the process of setting up an interdisciplinary research group on war, peace and religion in Oxford, and was the historical consultant to the BBC1 series Britain and the First World War presented by Jeremy Paxman.

Dr Adrian Gregory is the Damon Wells Fellow in Modern History at Pembroke College and Associate Professor of Modern History in the History Faculty, University of Oxford. He directs CCW’s sister programme on the Globalising and Localising the Great War.

Adrian's research interests lie in twentieth century British and European History with special reference to the World Wars. As part of his research on the First World War in British and Global History, he is in the final phases of a new short history of the war to be published by Oxford University Press and has recently contributed a chapter on 'Religion and Belief' to the new Cambridge Encyclopaedia of the First World War. He is also in the process of setting up an interdisciplinary research group on war, peace and religion in Oxford, and was the historical consultant to the BBC1 series Britain and the First World War presented by Jeremy Paxman.

Dr Adrian Gregory

Associate Professor of Modern History, Damon Wells Fellow in Modern History, & Fellow of Pembroke College, Oxford.

Andrew Hurrell is Montague Burton Professor of International Relations at Oxford University and a Fellow of Balliol College. He was elected to the British Academy in 2011 and to the Johns Hopkins Society of Scholars in 2010. He is a Delegate of Oxford University Press and a member of the Finance Committee (the board of the company). His book, On Global Order. Power, Values and the Constitution of International Society (published by Oxford University Press) was the winner of International Studies Association Prize for Best Book in the field of International Relations in 2009. Other publications include: (with Ngaire Woods), Inequality, Globalization and World Politics (1999); and (with Louise Fawcett), Regionalism in World Politics (1995). He was named in the 2011 Teaching, Research, and International Policy (TRIP) survey as one of top twenty academics to have made the most influential contribution to IR over the previous five years, and was one of only two non-US based academics in that group. He is Member of the Long Range Planning Committee of the International Studies Association. His research interests cover theories of international relations; theories of global governance; the history of thought on international relations; comparative regionalism; and the international relations of the Americas, with particular reference to Brazil. His current work focuses on emerging powers and the globalization of international society and what this means for ideas and practices of global order, for IR theory, and for international normative theory. Collaborative projects include concerts of power in the 21st century; provincializing Westphalia; and ASEAN integration through law. He is also completing a short introduction to global governance.

Andrew Hurrell is Montague Burton Professor of International Relations at Oxford University and a Fellow of Balliol College. He was elected to the British Academy in 2011 and to the Johns Hopkins Society of Scholars in 2010. He is a Delegate of Oxford University Press and a member of the Finance Committee (the board of the company).

His book, On Global Order. Power, Values and the Constitution of International Society (published by Oxford University Press) was the winner of International Studies Association Prize for Best Book in the field of International Relations in 2009. Other publications include: (with Ngaire Woods), Inequality, Globalization and World Politics (1999); and (with Louise Fawcett), Regionalism in World Politics (1995).

He was named in the 2011 Teaching, Research, and International Policy (TRIP) survey as one of top twenty academics to have made the most influential contribution to IR over the previous five years, and was one of only two non-US based academics in that group. He is Member of the Long Range Planning Committee of the International Studies Association.

His research interests cover theories of international relations; theories of global governance; the history of thought on international relations; comparative regionalism; and the international relations of the Americas, with particular reference to Brazil.

His current work focuses on emerging powers and the globalization of international society and what this means for ideas and practices of global order, for IR theory, and for international normative theory. Collaborative projects include concerts of power in the 21st century; provincializing Westphalia; and ASEAN integration through law. He is also completing a short introduction to global governance.

Professor Andrew Hurrell

Montague Burton Professor of International Relations at Oxford University and Fellow of Balliol College