Sep
25
4:00 PM16:00

Expert Roundtable on Ethics and Conflict Research

16:00 to 17:30, 25 September 2018
Nuffield College, Large Lecture Room

Research on conflict dynamics is accompanied by challenging ethical questions. How can scholars research the causes, character and consequences of armed conflict and political violence in an ethical, humane way? Does research only have to lead to better understanding of the drivers of conflict, or should it also aim to ameliorate human suffering? The ways in which scholars address these questions will affect, among other things, the ways data are generated and used; the responsibilities and obligations of researchers to multiple stakeholders, including the human subjects with whom they may engage over extended periods in high-risk settings; and the practical value and implications of the knowledge scholars produce. The aim of the roundtable is to bring these issues to the fore and reflect on how individual scholars and the political science community can respond to the ethical demands and dilemmas of researching violent armed conflict.

Our four speakers – scholars who have made important recent contributions to these debates – will be invited to discuss the ethical aspects of all stages of the research cycle, from identifying urgent and important research questions and designing appropriate strategies to answer them, to safely and responsibly conducting research in fragile and insecure environments with the associated risks to the researcher, their research subjects, and local partners, and then disseminating the findings in useful and impactful ways.

The roundtable is part of the Workshop on Conflict Dynamics, generously supported by Nuffield College, the Changing Character of War Centre and the Centre for International Studies at the University of Oxford, and the Centre for the Study of Terrorism and Political Violence at St Andrews University.

Registration for this event is essential: please email: nicholas.barker@nuffield.ox.ac.uk

Speaker Biographies:

Kate Cronin-Furman

Dr Kate-Cronin Furman studies mass atrocities and human rights. Her research has been published or is forthcoming in International Studies QuarterlyPolitical Science & Politics, and the International Journal of Transitional Justice. She also writes regularly for the mainstream media, with recent commentary pieces appearing in The Los Angeles Review of Books, SlateForeign PolicyThe Washington Post's Monkey Cage blog, War on the Rocks, and Al Jazeera. In September 2018, she joined the Department of Political Science at University College London as a Lecturer (Assistant Professor) in human rights. She received her Ph.D. in political science from Columbia in October 2015 and has held fellowships at the Harvard Kennedy School's Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs and Stanford's Center for International Security and Cooperation. She also has a J.D. (Columbia, 2006) and has practiced law in New York, Cambodia, and The Hague.
http://www.katecroninfurman.com/

Roxanne Krystalli

Roxani Krystalli is the Humanitarian Evidence Program Manager at the Feinstein International Center at Tufts University. Her research focuses on patterns of violence in mass atrocities and on victim-centered transitional justice, paying particular attention to gender and other dimensions of power. Roxani has spent a decade working on issues of gender and violence in conflict areas and transitional contexts. For her work, Roxani has been recognized with the Presidential Award for Citizenship and Service at Tufts University. She is a US Institute of Peace “Peace Scholar,” a recipient of the Social Science Research Council International Dissertation Research Fellowship and Dissertation Proposal Development Fellowship and holds a fellowship from the National Science Foundation and the Henry J. Leir Institute for Human Security. Her published work has appeared in The International Feminist Journal of Politics, The Washington Post, The Conversation, Open Democracy, Women Under Siege, NextBillion, and the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative blog. Roxani has a BA from Harvard University an MA from The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, and she is a PhD Candidate at The Fletcher School, where she is researching the politics of victimhood during transitions from violence, with a focus on the case of Colombia.

Milli Lake

Dr Milli Lake is an Assistant Professor of International Security at the London School of Economics' Department of International Relations. She completed her doctorate in Political Science at the University of Washington in 2014, and her expertise lies in political violence, state-building and the rule of law in violence and conflict-affected states. Her work focuses on central and east Africa. Recent projects include an examination of the relationships between post-conflict institution-building and local dynamics of peace and violence in DR Congo, and examinations of the prosecution of sexual and gender-based crimes in DR Congo and South Africa. Her recent book Strong NGOs and Weak States, was published with Cambridge University Press in 2018, and other research appears in outlets including International OrganizationInternational Studies QuarterlyWorld DevelopmentLaw and Society Review, and the Annual Review of Law and Social Science. Dr Lake has worked as an area specialist and a rule of law consultant with organizations such as USAID, The World Bank, Save the Children, the International Rescue Committee, Berkeley School of Law and the International Law and Policy Institute. She regularly provides expert testimony in asylum cases and has written and taught extensively on the ethics and practicalities of field research in violence-affected settings.
https://millimaylake.weebly.com/

Anouk Rigterink

Dr Anouk Rigterink is a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Blavatnik School of Government and the Economics Department, Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Natural Resource Rich Economies (OxCarre). She holds a PhD from the London School of Economics and Political Science. Anouk investigates the political economy of violent conflict. Specifically, she researchers whether and how natural resources (especially diamonds) are related to violent conflict, the impact of media in conflict-affected situations, and individual and group behaviour in violent conflict, including the impact of drone strikes on the internal organisations of terrorist groups in Pakistan. 
http://www.anoukrigterink.com

 

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Oct
12
5:00 PM17:00

War and Peace and Space

Dr. Nikita S.W. Chiu

12th October 2018 5:00pm
Larkin Room, St. John's College
Reception immediately following

Jointly organised by:
The Changing Character of War Centre
OxPeace - Oxford Network of Peace Studies
The Centre for Technology and Global Affairs

Dr. Nikita Chiu is Research Fellow in Robotics and Outer Space Affairs at the Centre for Technology and Global Affairs at the University of Oxford. She is also a Research Affiliate at the Centre for the Study of Existential Risk at the University of Cambridge.

Her current work examines the impact that emerging technologies have on International Relations and the international order, with a specific focus on space and quantum technologies, as well as highly autonomous systems.

Nikita completed her PhD under the supervision of Prof. Thomas Biersteker at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva. She had served as visiting scholar at the Diplomatic Academy of Vienna, Trinity College Dublin, and the Prague Secretariat of the OSCE. While as a Ernst Mach scholar, she investigated multilevel governance endeavours in the areas of climate change, drug control, and nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation. Prior to moving to the UK, she taught Chinese Foreign Policy and International Relations in Hong Kong and Estonia.

Besides her academic endeavours, Nikita has also undertaken training in bespoke men's tailoring and design. In her spare time, she enjoys constructing her own garments, drawing, and exploring the Irish indie music scene.

Nikita speaks Chinese, English, French, and has a passive knowledge of Italian and an elementary understanding of Russian.

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CCW Conference: The Conduct of War - Past, present and Future
Jun
26
to Jun 29

CCW Conference: The Conduct of War - Past, present and Future

Wednesday 26 - Friday 28 June 2019.
Pembroke College, Oxford

A 3 day conference on the Conduct of War: Past, Present and Future.

Call for papers

Armed conflict in the early twenty first century combined some established continuities of the past with the complexity of new technologies and some emergent novel techniques.

The first two decades were initially dominated by the question of how to tackle international terrorism and the extent to which major powers, and their coalition allies, should intervene in the affairs of other states to tackle them. There were extensive and protracted insurgencies in Afghanistan and Iraq against Western interventions, which gave rise to renewed interest in the practices of counter-insurgency. By the mid-2010s, however, rivalry between the Western powers and Russia had deepened to the point that both sides were making use of proxies to further their national interests. The United States found allies in Afghanistan, amongst the Kurds, and through their Iraqi partners, but Russia launched its own expeditionary war in favour of the Syrian government, made extensive use of paramilitaries in eastern Ukraine’s Donbass region, and aligned itself more closely with Iran and Hezbollah to conduct operations against Syrian resistance groups. The ‘hybrid’ technique of local forces with the backing of the latest technologies, especially in air power, produced a great deal of interest amongst military professionals, and political leaders looking for ways to reduce liabilities and maximize their freedom of action in international affairs.

While these developments consumed global attention, there was a parallel transformation underway in new technologies, especially in automated, unmanned and robotic weapons and surveillance systems. There was considerable interest in the potential of connectivity, disruptive cyber viruses, information warfare, new synthetic materials, and artificial intelligence. Although the future was unclear, it was already evident that being able to combine the right technology and technique could produce far-reaching effects. Intelligence activity, especially by China, Russia, and the United States, was intense.

Nevertheless, the actual wars of the early-twenty first century had the hallmarks of previous conflicts, especially in less developed countries. Urban warfare was still fought at close quarters amid high levels of destruction. Civilians were often the target of military operations, and terrorist organisations aimed at killing the maximum number in their attacks. Chemical warfare reappeared on the battlefields of Iraq and Syria. Improvised mines were the weapon of choice of insurgent movements, and their wars of attrition echoed the guerrilla conflicts of the twentieth century. Improved and pervasive surveillance, precise weapon systems, and developed legal parameters were impaired by the friction of these wars.

In this conference, we seek leading scholars and world-leading ideas on the changing character of war, its enduring nature, its drivers and its implications. Our ethos is to be inter-disciplinary and to encourage scholars, armed forces professionals, and policy advisors to submit individual papers or formed panels.

Some suggested themes for papers and panels, but which should not preclude original ideas, might include the conduct of war or organised armed conflict in:

  • Strategic Decision-Making and the Friction of Institutions

  • Historical Precedents for 21st Century Command in the Multi-Domain Environment

  • Offensive Cyber Operations: Grounds for War?

  • Information Warfare and Psychological Operations

  • The Enduring Human Dimensions of War

  • High-Intensity Air/Naval/Land Warfare in the Information and Synthetic Age

  • Terrorism: The Next Generation

  • Nuclear Security Scenarios

  • Environments of War: Borderlands, Peripheries, and the Mega-Urban Space

  • Guides to the legal and Ethical Parameters of War

  • Survival in chemical warfare

 

Paper and Panel Submissions

Paper outlines should be a maximum of 800 words and panel suggestions no more than 2000 words, showing how the themes of change in war are to be addressed. Paper authors and panellists should each submit a CV of no more than 3 pages. Suggestions should be submitted by 0900, 26th November 2018. The suggested papers and panels will be assessed by a distinguished panel and decisions announced in January 2019.

Conference Details

The conference will be held at on 26-28 June 2019 at Pembroke College, Oxford.. There are excellent public transport links to Oxford and around the city from all UK cities and airports.

Contacts

Paper and Panel suggestions should be addressed to elizabeth.robson@pmb.ox.ac.uk

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Dr Andrew Monaghan at Lewes Speakers Festival
Jul
22
4:15 PM16:15

Dr Andrew Monaghan at Lewes Speakers Festival

Dr Andrew Monaghan will be at the Lewes Speakers festival on 22 July. He will appear in discussion first with Dr Florence Gaub on her new book The Cauldron: NATO's Campaign in Libya; and then in discussion with LTG (red) Ben Hodges, former Commander of US Army Europe, on his book, What does Russia's resurgence mean for Euro-Atlantic security?


Florence Gaub, The Cauldron: NATO’s Campaign in Libya

In March 2011, NATO launched a mission hitherto entirely unthinkable: to protect civilians against Libya's ferocious regime, solely from the air. NATO had never operated in North Africa, or without troops on the ground; it also had never had to move as quickly as it did that spring. It took seven months, 25,000 air sorties, 7,000 combat strike missions, and 3,100 maritime hailings for Tripoli to fall. This talk tells, for the first time, the whole story of this international drama. It spans the hallways of the United Nations in New York, NATO Headquarters in Brussels and, crucially, the two operational epicentres: the Libyan battlefield, and Joint Force Command Naples. Gaub offers a comprehensive exploration of both the war's progression and the many challenges NATO faced, from its extremely rapid planning and limited understanding of Libya and its forces, to training shortfalls and the absence of post-conflict planning. This is a long-awaited account of the Libyan war: one that truly considers all the actors involved.


Lt General Hodges, What does Russia’s resurgence mean for Euro-Atlantic security?

Euro-Atlantic security is quickly and significantly evolving. Following the end of the Cold War, many assumed that Europe had seen the last of state against state warfare.  There was also a shift from thinking in terms of collective defence towards collective security. But since the eruption of war in Ukraine in 2014, there has been a radical rethink. Russia is seen to pose a major challenge to the international order. The ongoing deterioration of relations between the Euro-Atlantic community and Russia since then, with mutual accusations of cyber attacks, interference in domestic politics, disagreements and high tension in the war in Syria and, most recently the attempted murder of the Skripals in Salisbury, have reintroduced a state of high tension in European security.

Hodges and Monaghan will discuss how European security is changing, and what this means in practical terms. They look at whether it is possible to return to thinking in terms of "collective defence" and what that might mean in the 21st Century. LTG Hodges will reflect on his time in service, his priorities and the problems he faced, and the roles of the US and NATO in European security. They will also talk about the tensions within the Alliance and the TransAtlantic relationship, and how is Russia seen in Washington, D.C. and Brussels.

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Dr Andrew Monaghan: Power in Modern Russia
Jun
30
4:00 PM16:00

Dr Andrew Monaghan: Power in Modern Russia

Dr Andrew Monaghan  will be presenting his book, Power in Modern Russia at the Felixstowe Book Festival on 30th June.

If you have ever thought it important to understand what is happening in Russia, take the opportunity to hear from one of the UK’s leading experts as Andrew Monaghan unravels the Russian leadership’s strategic agenda and illuminates the range of problems it faces in implementing its ambitions. With presidential elections looming, he maps out the evolution underway in Russian domestic politics and explains the various factions.

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Why We Fight
Jun
25
5:00 PM17:00

Why We Fight

Monday 25 June 2018, 5pm
Seminar Room A, Manor Road Building, University of Oxford
All Welcome

A seminar with Mike Martin, Visiting Research Fellow, Department of War Studies, King’s College London

CCW's Conflict Platform team is delighted to host Mike Martin for a seminar on ‘Why We
Fight’, drawing on his recently published book of the same name.

When we go to war, morality, religion and ideology often take the blame. Mike argues that
the opposite is true: rather than driving violence, these things help to reduce it. While we
resort to ideas and values to justify or interpret warfare, something else is really
propelling us towards conflict: our subconscious desires, shaped by millions of years of
evolution.

His previous books include An Intimate War: An Oral History of the Helmand Conflict
and Crossing the Congo: Over Land and Water in a Hard Place, the latter of which was
shortlisted for the Edward Stanford Adventure Travel Writing Award in 2016.

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‘Royal Engineers, Railways, and the Retreat: Longmoor's Role in Delaying the Japanese Advance through Burma in 1942’
Jun
13
5:15 PM17:15

‘Royal Engineers, Railways, and the Retreat: Longmoor's Role in Delaying the Japanese Advance through Burma in 1942’

History of War Seminars 2018
Week 8: Wednesday 13 June

All events take place on Wednesdays 5.15, Wharton Room, All Souls College


Michael Charney (SOAS) ‘Royal Engineers, Railways, and the Retreat: Longmoor's Role in Delaying the Japanese Advance through Burma in 1942’

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The Global History of War Lecture: Reaping the Rewards:  How the Governor, the Priest, the Taxman, and the Garrison Secure Victory in World History
Jun
2
5:00 PM17:00

The Global History of War Lecture: Reaping the Rewards:  How the Governor, the Priest, the Taxman, and the Garrison Secure Victory in World History

Oxford’s Centre for Global History and the Changing Character of War Centre, Pembroke College are pleased to host:

The Global History of War Lecture

Wayne E. Lee (UNC)

'Reaping the Rewards:  How the Governor, the Priest, the Taxman, and the Garrison Secure Victory in World History'

Pembroke College Pichette Auditorium
Saturday 2 June 2018, 5pm


Francis Bacon once opined: "Augustus Caesar would say, that he wondered that Alexander feared he should want work, having no more worlds to conquer: as if it were not as hard a matter to keep as to conquer."  Many societies have found that the process of converting military success into a consolidated conquest was harder than they expected.  Oddly, historians have not spent that much time on the problem either, preferring to focus more on the battles than the ensuing garrisons.  In this sweep through world military history, strategy, and logistics, Lee explores the "four pillars" of conquest (the titular governor, priest, tax man and garrison) and he then compares how those same pillars worked in non-state societies on the Eurasian steppe and in the Native American woodlands.

Wayne E. Lee is the Dowd Distinguished Professor of History at the University of North Carolina, where he also chairs the Curriculum in Peace, War, and Defense. He is the author of Waging War: Conflict, Culture, and Innovation in World History (2016), Barbarians and Brothers: Anglo-American Warfare, 1500-1865 (2011), and Crowds and Soldiers in Revolutionary North Carolina (2001) as well as two edited volumes on world military history and many articles and book chapters.  Lee has an additional career as an archaeologist, having done field work in Greece, Albania, Hungary, Croatia, and Virginia, including co-directing two field projects.  He was a principal author and a co-editor of Light and Shadow: Isolation and Interaction in the Shala Valley of Northern Albania, winner of the 2014 Society for American Archaeology's book award. In 2015/16 Lee was the Harold K. Johnson Visiting Professor of Military History at the U.S. Army War College.

Registration is required by contacting global@history.ox.ac.uk. A drinks reception will follow the lecture and all are welcome to attend.

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‘Glamping with Guns: Louis XIV, the Camp of Compiègne and the Origins of the Modern Military Exercise’
May
30
5:15 PM17:15

‘Glamping with Guns: Louis XIV, the Camp of Compiègne and the Origins of the Modern Military Exercise’

History of War Seminars 2018
Week 6: Wednesday 30 May

All events take place on Wednesdays 5.15, Wharton Room, All Souls College


 Guy Rowlands (St Andrews) ‘Glamping with Guns: Louis XIV, the Camp of Compiègne and the Origins of the Modern Military Exercise’

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The Korean Missile Crisis: Avoiding the Cliffs at the Edge of the Summit
May
25
4:30 PM16:30

The Korean Missile Crisis: Avoiding the Cliffs at the Edge of the Summit

Friday, 25 May (Week 5) at 5pm
Lecture Theatre of the Blavatnik School of Government

Scott D. Sagan is the Caroline S.G. Munro Professor of Political Science, the Mimi and Peter Haas University Fellow in Undergraduate Education, and Senior Fellow at the Center for International Security and Cooperation and the Freeman Spogli Institute at Stanford University. He was recently named Andrew Carnegie Fellow and he serves as Chairman of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences’ Committee on International Security Studies. Sagan is the author of Moving Targets: Nuclear Strategy and National Security (Princeton University Press, 1989); The Limits of Safety: Organizations, Accidents, and Nuclear Weapons (Princeton University Press, 1993); and, with co-author Kenneth N. Waltz, The Spread of Nuclear Weapons: An Enduring Debate (W.W. Norton, 2012). He is the co-editor of Learning from a Disaster: Improving Nuclear Safety and Security after Fukushima (Stanford University Press, 2016) with Edward D. Blandford and co-editor of Insider Threats (Cornell University Press, 2017) with Matthew Bunn.

This event is sponsored by the Blavatnik School of Government; the Oxford Institute for Ethics, Law and Armed Conflict; the Changing Character of War Centre; the Oxford Consortium for Human Rights, and the Oxford Security Policy Initiative. For more information, go to https://www.bsg.ox.ac.uk/events/korean-missile-crisis-avoiding-cliffs-edge-summit 

Please register at https://www.bsg.ox.ac.uk/node/4506 

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CCW Annual Lecture 2018: 'Causes of Wars, Old and New’ by Professor Sir Adam Roberts KCMG FBA
May
23
5:00 PM17:00

CCW Annual Lecture 2018: 'Causes of Wars, Old and New’ by Professor Sir Adam Roberts KCMG FBA

CCW Annual Lecture 2018
Wednesday 23rd May, 5.00pm
Pichette auditorium, Pembroke College, Oxford, OX1 1DW

'Causes of Wars, Old and New’

By Professor Sir Adam Roberts KCMG FBA


The causes of both civil and international wars have long been the subject of much debate and also academic study. Numerous methodologies have been employed, including those of the anthropologist, the demographer, the economist, the meteorologist, the philosopher, the psychologist, the social scientist, and the strategist. Each of them sheds light on the subject, but none provides on its own a satisfactory answer to the very wide-ranging question of what causes wars – and also how they can be prevented. Adam Roberts suggests that the absence of a unified theory of the causes of war is not a disaster. However, the present period of growing nationalism and great power rivalry forces us to look again at the causes of international as well as non-international armed conflicts.


800px-Adam_Roberts,_Oxford,_April_2006.JPG

Adam Roberts is Emeritus Professor of International Relations at Oxford University, and Emeritus Fellow of Balliol College, Oxford. He was one of the founding members of CCW and served on its Academic Board before his retirement, and is now Honorary Fellow and Member of the CCW Advisory Board.

Sir Adam was President of the British Academy (2009-13). He is an Honorary Fellow of the London School of Economics & Political Science (1997- ), of St Antony's College Oxford (2006- ), and of the University of Cumbria (2014- ). He has been awarded Honorary Doctorates by King's College London (2010), Aberdeen University (2012), Aoyama Gakuin University, Tokyo (2012), and Bath University (2014). He is a Foreign Honorary Member, American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2011- ), and a Member of the American Philosophical Society (2013- ). He was a member of the Council of the International Institute for Strategic Studies, London (2002-8); member of the UK Defence Academy Advisory Board (2003-15); and member, Board of Advisers of the Lieber Institute for Law and Land Warfare, at the United States Military Academy, West Point, September 2016– .

Sir Adam remains actively engaged in research and is a regular speaker at CCW events. His main research interests are in the fields of international security, international organizations, and international law (including the laws of war). He has also worked extensively on the role of civil resistance against authoritarian regimes and foreign rule, and on the history of thought about international relations. :

Causes of War Lecture 2018-01.jpg

 

 

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'North Korea's Hidden Revolution' by Jieun Baek
May
15
1:00 PM13:00

'North Korea's Hidden Revolution' by Jieun Baek

Tuesday Lunchtime Seminar Series
Trinity Term 2018: Week 4

Seminars at 1.00pm, Seminar Room G, Manor Road Building, Oxford. A light sandwich lunch is served at 12.50pm. All are welcome. 


'North Korea's Hidden Revolution' by Jieun Baek

One of the least understood countries in the world, North Korea has long been known for its repressive regime. Yet it is far from being an impenetrable black box. Media flows covertly into the country, and fault lines are appearing in the government’s sealed informational borders. Baek will describe how information has been illicitly flowing into North Korea, and what kinds of impact this unprecedented access to foreign information is having on North Korean citizens’ social and political attitudes towards the regime and each other. For the first time, Baek will briefly discuss her organization’s work, and invite feedback for some strategic questions from the attendees at the Changing Character of War event.

Jieun Baek is a doctoral candidate in public policy at Oxford's Blavatnik School of Government where she is studying the factors that motivate first movers of dissent in Burma, and potential causal pathways that lead to dissent escalation. She is the author of North Korea's Hidden Revolution: How the Information Underground is Transforming a Closed Society (Yale University Press), and is the founder/director of Lumen.org. She did her bachelors and masters in public policy at Harvard University. 

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'Offensive Cyber, Ecology & the Competition for Security in Cyberspace: The UK’s Approach' by Graham Fairclough
May
8
1:00 PM13:00

'Offensive Cyber, Ecology & the Competition for Security in Cyberspace: The UK’s Approach' by Graham Fairclough

Tuesday Lunchtime Seminar Series
Trinity Term 2018: Week 3

Seminars at 1.00pm, Seminar Room G, Manor Road Building, Oxford. A light sandwich lunch is served at 12.50pm. All are welcome.


'Offensive Cyber, Ecology & the Competition for Security in Cyberspace: The UK’s Approach' by Graham Fairclough

The 2013 public announcement by the then Secretary of State for Defence, Phillip Hammond stating that the United Kingdom was creating an offensive cyber capability as part of its national cyber security strategy moved the debate on the use of offensive cyber into the public policy sphere. While this debate has continued, little detail has emerged as to how offensive cyber will be integrated as a tool into the United Kingdom’s cyber security strategy and more broadly its national security structure. The Strategic Cyber Security (SCS) model seeks to answer these questions by illustrating how offensive cyber capability has been operationalised as a critical component in the delivery of the United Kingdom’s cyber security strategy. Drawing upon elements of ecological theory the model demonstrates how different cyber security effects are generated to deliver an holistic response to achieving security in the increasingly competitive environment of cyberspace. Development of the model is based upon a series of elite interviews with senior military and civilian policy makers and key stakeholders within the United Kingdom’s cyber security and national security communities.

Graham Fairclough is a former soldier now attempting to become an academic in the field of cybersecurity. His research is focused on the operationalisation of national cyber security strategy, in particular the integration of offensive cyber capability and how cyber security incidents are understood by decision makers with limited cyber security knowledge. He advises NATO and the UK’s MOD on operational cyber security matters.  

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‘Mercenaries, Militiamen, and Modernity: the Rhetoric of Military Reform in Nassau c. 1580-1620’ & ‘Another Attempt at Greatness: Swedish finances and administration in occupied Poland (1655-1657)’
May
2
5:15 PM17:15

‘Mercenaries, Militiamen, and Modernity: the Rhetoric of Military Reform in Nassau c. 1580-1620’ & ‘Another Attempt at Greatness: Swedish finances and administration in occupied Poland (1655-1657)’

History of War Seminars 2018
Week 2: Wednesday 2 May

All events take place on Wednesdays 5.15, Wharton Room, All Souls College


Louis Morris (Oxford), ‘Mercenaries, Militiamen, and Modernity: the Rhetoric of Military Reform in Nassau c. 1580-1620’

Alex Turchyn (Oxford) ‘Another Attempt at Greatness: Swedish finances and administration in occupied Poland (1655-1657)’

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'Cyber Strategy: The Evolution of Cyber Power and Coercion' by Brandon Valeriano 
May
1
1:00 PM13:00

'Cyber Strategy: The Evolution of Cyber Power and Coercion' by Brandon Valeriano 

Tuesday Lunchtime Seminar Series
Trinity Term 2018: Week 2

Seminars at 1.00pm, Seminar Room G, Manor Road Building, Oxford. A light sandwich lunch is served at 12.50pm. All are welcome.


'Cyber Strategy: The Evolution of Cyber Power and Coercion' by Brandon Valeriano

This project examines the changing character of cyber strategies in the digital domain. We develop a theory that cyber operations are a form of covert coercion typically seeking to send ambiguous signals or demonstrate resolve. Cyber Coercion from this perspective is neither as revolutionary nor as novel as it seems when evaluated with evidence. We examine cyber strategies in their varying forms through quantitative analysis, finding that cyber disruptions, short-term and long-term espionage, and degradation operations all usually fail to produce political concessions. When states do compel a rival, which is measured as a change in behavior in the target that is strategically advantageous to the initiator, the cyber operation tends to occur alongside more traditional coercive instruments such as diplomatic pressure, economic sanctions, and military threats and displays. Our findings suggest that before we develop recommendations for sound foreign policy responses to state-backed cyber intrusions or craft international frameworks that constrain the proliferation of politically-motivated malware, we should theoretically and empirically investigate cyber strategies and their efficacy.

Brandon Valeriano is the Donald Bren Chair of Armed Conflict at the Marine Corps University. He has published five books and dozens of articles. His two most recent books are Cyber War versus Cyber Reality (2015) and Cyber Strategy (2018), both with Oxford University Press. Ongoing research explores cyber coercion, biological examinations of cyber threat, repression in cyberspace, and the influence of video games on foreign policy outlooks.

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'Artificial Intelligence, Robotics and Conflict' by Al Brown
Apr
24
1:00 PM13:00

'Artificial Intelligence, Robotics and Conflict' by Al Brown

Tuesday Lunchtime Seminar Series
Trinity Term 2018: Week 4

Seminars at 1.00pm, Seminar Room G, Manor Road Building, Oxford. A light sandwich lunch is served at 12.50pm. All are welcome. 


'Artificial intelligence, robotics and conflict' by Al Brown 

Secretary of Defence James Mattis recently said of artificial intelligence:  “I’m certainly questioning my original premise that the fundamental nature of war will not change. You’ve got to question that now. I just don’t have the answers yet.”  Vladimir Putin stated: “Artificial intelligence is the future, not only for Russia, but for all humankind.” .. “Whoever becomes the leader in this sphere will become the ruler of the world.” Robotics and artificial intelligence are already being employed in conflict.  However, artificial intelligence manages to sit at the peak of ‘inflated expectations’ on Gartner’s technology hype curve whilst simultaneously being underestimated in other assessments.  So what are the likely effects on conflict of the trends in artificial intelligence, robotics, economics, data and society? And what do people commonly get wrong - often with total certainty?

Al Brown works at the Ministry of Defence’s independent think tank where he leads on examining trends in robotics and artificial intelligence, and the potential impacts that follow for the future of conflict.  He has provided testimony on technology trends, including AI and robotics, and their defence and security implications to a number of organisations, including the United Nations.  His military career has included multiple operational tours of Afghanistan and Kosovo.  He is by military trade an explosive ordinance disposal officer, a field where robotics, data and algorithms have already been saving lives in conflict for a number of years.

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'Rethinking the Peace Negotiations in Colombia': Conversation with Dr. Annette Idler
Mar
12
6:30 PM18:30

'Rethinking the Peace Negotiations in Colombia': Conversation with Dr. Annette Idler

Rethinking the Peace Negotiations in Colombia

6.30pm, Monday 12 March 2018
Old Library, All Souls College, University of Oxford

All Welcome! 

At this event, Dr Idler will be in conversation with three distinguished guests, to take stock of the major challenges and opportunities in the context of the peace talks with the FARC, reflect on the current situation of the peace deal implementation, and consider the way forward in light of the elections. The event will be co-hosted by CCW’s "From Conflict Actors to Architects of Peace" (CONPEACE) programme and the Blavatnik School of Government.

Speakers:

HE Mr Néstor Osorio Londoño
Colombian Ambassador to the United Kingdom

Professor Eamon Gilmore
EU Special Envoy for the Peace Process in Colombia

Joaquin Villalobos
Peace Process Advisor to the Government of Colombia

(Chair) Dr Annette Idler
Director of Studies, Changing Character of War Centre
 

"From Conflict Actors to Architects of Peace" (CONPEACE)
https://conpeace.ccw.ox.ac.uk/

Blavatnik School of Government
www.bsg.ox.ac.uk

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Feb
28
5:15 PM17:15

'Russian Approach to Strategy' by Carl Scott CBE AFC FRAeS

Carl Scott CBE AFC FRAeS

A personal perspective on the character of Russian Strategy.  The speaker served as UK Defence Attache in Moscow from 2011 to 2016, offering an opportunity to witness, and attempt to understand, a critical period in the evolving relationship between Russia and its Western neighbours.  The aim is to consider the character of that strategy and its delivery through the decisions to engage in Ukraine and Syria.'

 Carl Scott CBE AFC FRAeS served as a pilot in the Royal Air Force, departing the Service in 2016 as an Air Commodore, having spent 2011 to 2016 in the Russian Federation as the UK Defence Attaché.

Earlier service includes periods in the British Defence Staff in Washington DC; in HQ Land Forces, with responsibility for the training and conduct of operations for UK Battlefield Helicopter forces; in the Ministry of Defence’s Directorate of Overseas Military Activity with responsibility for UK activity in the Gulf Region, and as a member of the Strategic Planning Group which formulated the UK response to the events of 9/11. 

In 2006 he established the UK Joint Helicopter Force in Afghanistan, serving as its first commander.  He served ten years in Special Operations forces, and has travelled extensively in the Gulf region liaising with commanders of the Armed Forces of Bahrain, Qatar, UAE, Oman and Yemen.

He was decorated with the Air Force Cross for gallantry in the air, and made a Commander of the Order of the British Empire for his contribution to the conversation on Russia.  He also holds the French National Defence Medal, Echelon D’Or.

He has served across the spectrum of conflict, in Northern Ireland, the Balkans, Iraq, Kuwait, and Afghanistan.  He has lectured at the US National Defence University, the NATO Defence College, the Royal Danish Staff College, the Royal College of Defence Studies in London and the Higher Command and Staff Course at the UK Joint Command and Staff College. 

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'Dealing with the Russians' by Dr Andrew Monaghan (Oxford) 
Feb
27
1:00 PM13:00

'Dealing with the Russians' by Dr Andrew Monaghan (Oxford) 

Seminars at 1.00pm, Seminar Room G, Manor Road Building, Oxford A light sandwich lunch is served at 12.50pm. All are welcome. 

This lecture explores the nature of the relationship between the Euro-Atlantic community and Russia and how to "deal with the Russians". It will reflect on the nature of the Russian policy - and suggest that this is often misdiagnosed by Euro-Atlantic observers, and then explore the extent to which dialogue may be possible and what deterrence might look like. 

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'21st Century Deterrence – an Ethical Strategy?' by Dr Andy Corbett (King's College, London) 
Feb
20
1:00 PM13:00

'21st Century Deterrence – an Ethical Strategy?' by Dr Andy Corbett (King's College, London) 

Seminars at 1.00pm, Seminar Room G, Manor Road Building, Oxford A light sandwich lunch is served at 12.50pm. All are welcome. The nature of deterrence policy in the 21st century is the subject of considerable analysis but its relevance in today's defence...

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Chameleon Wars: An Indian Perspective on The Changing Character of War
Feb
14
5:15 PM17:15

Chameleon Wars: An Indian Perspective on The Changing Character of War

Chameleon Wars: An Indian Perspective on The Changing Character of War

Air Vice Marshal Arjun Subramaniam (Retd)

Since independence from colonial rule in 1947, India's armed forces have played an important role in preserving the fabric of a secular, multi-cultural and multi-ethnic nation-state that many predicted would not survive for long. After the US and Israel, no other democracy in the post WW-II era has had to employ force as a tool of statecraft that has spread across multiple genres of warfare that have ranged from conventional conflict in varied terrain under a nuclear overhang, to varied hues of sub-conventional conflict. In such a milieu, it is imperative to investigate and analyse the contemporary 'Indian Way of War Fighting' from a strategic and applied historical perspective.

Air Vice Marshal Arjun Subramaniam (Retd) is a fighter pilot-scholar-author who recently retired from the Indian Air Force after 36 years in uniform. He is an experienced fighter pilot and pilot instructor who has flown MiG-21s and Mirage-2000s. Among his notable command and staff assignments have been command of a Mig-21 squadron, Chief Operations Officer of a SU-30 base, command of large flying base and a stint as an Assistant Chief of Air Staff looking after Space, Concepts and Doctrine. He has been at the forefront of Professional Military Education in India’s armed forces and served as a faculty member at the Defence Services Staff College (DSSC) and National Defence College (NDC). He has also served as part of the Indian Military Advisory Team in Zambia.

 A P.h.D in Defence and Strategic Studies from the University of Madras, India, he is a prolific writer, strategic commentator, and military historian and writes in the public domain for reputed journals, magazines and newspapers. He is the author of three books including the well-received ‘India’s Wars: A Military History 1947-1971’ that has been published in India by Harper Collins and has been recently published in the US by the US Naval Institute Press. His other books are titled ‘Reflections of an Air Warrior’ and ‘Wider Horizons: Perspectives on National Security, Air Power & Leadership.

He was a Visiting Fellow at the Harvard Asia Center to research and write the sequel to his book on war and conflict in contemporary India (1972-2015). He is also a Non-Resident Senior Fellow at the Mitchell Institute for Aerospace Power Studies in Washington D.C, and a contributing editor at The Print, an online news and opinion platform. On his current sabbatical, he has lectured at Harvard, MIT, Georgetown, Emory, Georgia Tech, Air War College, NDU and the Carnegie Endowment and is slated to speak extensively on his work at war colleges and universities across the US prior to joining the CCW in January 2018 for the Hilary and Trinity Term. 

CCW HT 2018 Arjun.jpg
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Adapting to Sanctions: How Russia Responded to Western Economic Statecraft by Dr Richard Connolly
Feb
13
1:00 PM13:00

Adapting to Sanctions: How Russia Responded to Western Economic Statecraft by Dr Richard Connolly

After Russia's annexation of Crimea in March 2014, Western powers and their allies responded by imposing sanctions on key sectors of the Russian economy. Richard Connolly, author of a forthcoming book on the subject, will discuss the impact of sanctions on targeted sectors, and how the response by policy-makers has shaped the development of political economy in Russia since 2014.

Seminars at 1.00pm, Seminar Room G, Manor Road Building, Oxford A light sandwich lunch is served at 12.50pm. All are welcome. 

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'The Decision Point: Military Command in the 21st Century' by Professor Anthony King (Warwick) 
Feb
6
1:00 PM13:00

'The Decision Point: Military Command in the 21st Century' by Professor Anthony King (Warwick) 

Seminars at 1.00pm, Seminar Room G, Manor Road Building, Oxford A light sandwich lunch is served at 12.50pm. All are welcome. Command has long been a major concern for military historians and security studies scholars. Focusing on the divisional headquarters and specifically on staff procedure, the ‘decision point’, this paper analyses the transformation of command in the 21st century. It claims that in contrast to the...

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'The Distribution of Power in Cyberspace: adjusting to the new seam of power competition' by Professor Richard Harknett (Cincinnatti) 
Jan
31
5:15 PM17:15

'The Distribution of Power in Cyberspace: adjusting to the new seam of power competition' by Professor Richard Harknett (Cincinnatti) 

What is the distribution of power in cyberspace? What defines it, shapes it and stabilizes it?  In examining these subset questions, this paper concludes that cyberspace should be understood as a new seam in global power competition. The manner in which cyber power is distributed will be a crucial variable in explaining the dynamics of 21st Century war, peace, and, most importantly, strategic behavior that sits between those two traditional categories.

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'Will Strong Nation-States and a Stronger United Nations Guarantee a New Global Order?' by Michael von der Schulenburg (Former UN Assistant Secretary-General)
Jan
31
4:00 PM16:00

'Will Strong Nation-States and a Stronger United Nations Guarantee a New Global Order?' by Michael von der Schulenburg (Former UN Assistant Secretary-General)

'Will Strong Nation-States and a Stronger United Nations Guarantee a New Global Order?'

By Michael von der Schulenburg (Former UN Assistant Secretary-General)

The event will be chaired by Sam Daws, Director, Project on UN Governance and Reform, CIS, DPIR 

Wednesday 31 January 4.00pm – 5.30pm
Seminar Room G, Manor Road Building, 5 Manor Road, Oxford OX1 3UQ

Michael von der Schulenburg will speak about his new book On Building Peace – Rescuing the Nation-State and Saving the United Nations, based on a lifetime working in countries with wars, conflict and social disintegration. He worked 34 years for the United Nations and participated in various strategic reviews of UN reform initiatives. He has served in many of the world’s trouble spots including Haiti, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Iran, Iraq, Syria, the Balkans, Somalia, Sierra Leone and the Sahel. 

Followed by drinks reception. 

All welcome but please register at nina.kruglikova@politics.ox.ac.uk

Michael von der Schulenburg - Event Poster.png
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'The Military's Role in the Fall of Robert Mugabe in 2017 ' by Dr Miles Tendi (Oxford)
Jan
30
1:00 PM13:00

'The Military's Role in the Fall of Robert Mugabe in 2017 ' by Dr Miles Tendi (Oxford)

Seminars at 1.00pm, Seminar Room G, Manor Road Building, Oxford A light sandwich lunch is served at 12.50pm. All are welcome. 

Zimbabwe's long-time president Robert Mugabe was forced to resign the presidency in November 2017, following a political intervention by the country's military. Miles Tendi has just returned from Zimbabwe after a mo...

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'How to Think About Limited War (Without Limiting Your Thinking)' by Professor Don Stoker (Vienna Diplomatic Academy) 
Jan
23
1:00 PM13:00

'How to Think About Limited War (Without Limiting Your Thinking)' by Professor Don Stoker (Vienna Diplomatic Academy) 

Seminars at 1.00pm, Seminar Room G, Manor Road Building, Oxford A light sandwich lunch is served at 12.50pm. All are welcome.  "Limited War" is one of the terms making a frequent appearance in the strategic studies, international relations, and military history realms...

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